PRESENTATIONS & WORKSHOPS FOR ADULTS

READING NONFICTION WITH CHILDREN
A motivational how-to for parents about the importance and rewards of reading nonfiction with their

children, including information about increasing attention spans, counteracting information over-load,
​learning to creatively use facts, enhancing knowledge bases, building bonds with friends and relatives,
and developing neural network connections. Includes guidelines for successful home reading plans.
​[ideal for literacy nights]​


USING NATURE NONFICTION TO CONQUER INFORMATION OVERLOAD AND DRIVE CREATIVE THINKING
Information has never been so quickly accessible from an incredible variety of sources, yet its potential
to drive the creative learning process is often underutilized. Explore ways education professionals can
use nature nonfiction books and digital research technology to expand creative, connect-the-dot thinking
​to transform students into content organizers and distributors.[ideal for librarians and teachers]

 
DILUTION EFFECTS IN NATURE NONFICTION BOOKS: CAN REAL SCIENCE BE FUN?
The broad spectrum of substance and style in nature nonfiction children’s books invites important 
questions for librarians, teachers, publishers, and authors. From cotton-candy fluff to encyclopedic
​tomes, this presentation reviews the spectrum with a focus on specific benefits and costs of various
approaches. [can be adapted for the interests of specific audiences]


TEACHING SCIENCE WITH GROSSOLOGY 
Trying to keep your students interested in biology, ecology, and chemistry? Tell them that elephants and
​rabbits eat poop, clams and mussels make mucus string to catch food, and young wolves eat their parents’
puke. Discover ways to integrate the science behind grossology in everyday teaching. Mucus facilitates
diffusion, and can also transfer antibiotics and toxins. Defecation removes waste materials, and also marks
territories, transfers microbes, scars and disperses seeds, and serves as food for bacteria, fungi, and some
animals. Vomit protects animals from poisons, and it also helps birds and some mammals feed their young,
deters predators, and helps some herbivores with digestion. Saliva moistens food and adds some digestive
enzymes, but modified salivary glands release venom in snakes, some lizards, octopuses, and some spiders.
[Science standard topics: anatomy, digestion, adaptation, behavior, taxonomy, organic molecules, microbes]



PRESENTATIONS & WORKSHOPS FOR KIDS & KID-LIKE ADULTS

National Science & Engineering Festival, Washington, DC,
   Child’s play: science as storytelling in nature nonfiction books, 2012


Family literacy night programs, elementary schools
   Reading non-fiction with children, 2010-present


*  South Carolina Book Festival, Columbia, South Carolina
   Learn, laugh, love: children’s books panel, 2015


Blue Ridge Writers Conference, Blue Ridge, North Carolina
   Trends in children’s publishing; Publishing math, 2015​

North Carolina State Science Teacher’s Association Conference, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
   Building literacy with grossology books; Leading with giraffes instead of molecules, 2015


Mountain Science Festival, N.C. Arboretum, Asheville, NC
    Animal behavior: the best-kept secret in science, 2014, 3013


North Carolina State Children’s School Library Media Association, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
   Beta testing new books through author visits (with Beverly McBrayer); Using nature nonfiction to
   conquer information overload; Dilution effects in nature nonfiction books: can real science be fun?
 
​   Award-winning Science Books
​   2017, 2014, 2012, 2011




SAMPLING OF PRESENTATIONS & WORKSHOPS

RESEARCH!
Take an illustrated tour of the nonfiction book research process, from domino-effect discoveries to 
​disappointing dead-ends. Learn about sources, key words, research questions, creativity, copyright,
audience, and the one and only certainty: research will always reward you! Adaptable for any age
group; your choice of book topic(s).


AMAZING ANIMAL BEHAVIOR: THE BEST-KEPT SECRET IN SCIENCE
When people hear the phrase "animal behavior," they often assume biologists are talking about 
cute animal stories. It’s true that the natural world is filled with fun stories. Just below the surface, 
though, these stories provide fascinating glimpses into the intense competition for food, habitat,
and mates that shapes the amazing diversity of the world’s animals. Come explore the world of
​antennae fencing, jet propulsion, egg guarding, territory marking, nest building, and more. Real science
​is fun! Includes tie-in readings from Animals That Make Me Say Wow, Animals That Make Me Say Ouch,
Animals That Make Me Say Look Out, Bug Butts, Cool Animal Names, Animal Eggs,
and Get the Scoop
on Animal Poop.


EWWW, GROSS! A WORLD-WIDE TOUR
​OF ANIMAL SLIME, SNOT, PUKE, AND POOP AND THE REALLY COOL SCIENCE BEHIND IT
Do you think it’s fun to gross out your parents, teachers, and friends with gross animal facts? Well, get
ready to leave them crying . . . or crying for more. Includes tie-in readings from Animals That Make Me
Say Ewww, Get the Scoop on Animal Snot, Spit & Slime, 
and Get the Scoop on Animal Puke. 
[can be customized to focus on biology, chemistry, ecology, or anatomy]


ANIMAL SNACKS: A SWEET WAY TO LEARN MORE ABOUT ANIMALS & ECOSYSTEMS
When we think about animals, we rarely think about what they eat, yet food plays a major role in how
animals live and behave. Eating carbohydrates such as nectar and leaves means you have to eat a lot.
(Just ask herbivores such as elephants or pandas that spend most of their time eating.) Eating high-fat
foods lets you store energy for later. (Just ask a hibernating hedgehog or an alligator with fat stored in
its tail.) Animals forage for food in many ways: some search alone, others search in groups. And how
​do you find food without becoming another animal’s food? Great stories are everywhere! Includes tie-in
readings from Animal Snacks, Get the Scoop on Animal Puke, and Animal Eggs.

 
ANIMAL DIGESTIVE SYSTEMS ROCK . . . FROM ONE END OF THE ALIMENTARY CANAL TO THE OTHER
This play-and-learn presentation opens with a basic review of digestive anatomy, and then turns the
​fun over to audience. Children chose an animal, then build a digestive system that works for its diet.
Discussions of long- and short-term energy storage, foraging strategies, and anatomy follow. For

dessert, we’ll make a graham cracker chyme base, add a scoop of ice cream, and then use pipettes to
squirt in digest enzymes (chocolate and strawberry syrup) from accessory organs such as the pancreas
and the gall bladder. Includes tie-in readings from Get the Scoop on Animal Snot, Spit & Slime, Get the
Scoop on Animal Puke,
Animal Snacks, Animal Tongues,
and Animal Eggs. Comparative anatomy has 
​never been so much fun!


ANIMAL EGGS: HATCH A LITTLE FUN AND LEARN A LOT OF SCIENCE 
Tour the wild and wonderful world of animal eggs in a highly visual, compare-and-contrast format.
Lionfish lay more than a million eggs twice a year, and leave them floating in plankton, undefended
from predators. Jaw-fish lay only a few dozen eggs, and guard them in their mouths. Most reptiles lay
leathery eggs that stretch to accommodate growing embryos, while crocodiles, alligators and birds
​lay hard-shelled eggs. Apple snails and some insects lay pink eggs, while some birds and stink bugs
​lay blue eggs. How? Why? Includes tie-in readings from Animal Eggs and Animal Snacks.